Posts (9)

Fri, Feb 7 7:42pm · Restored knee function transforms patient's life, inspires giving

Hello – thank you for reading! At Mayo Clinic we work closely with our Office of Research and Regulatory Support to ensure our providers are in full compliance with current federal regulations when using regenerative products, including cellular, non-cellular and tissue products, for medical conditions. Additionally, experts in the Center for Regenerative Medicine regularly engage the FDA when conducting scientific clinical trials, putting in action the recognized principles of safe and responsible translation of regenerative therapies in line with FDA recommended best practices for scientists and providers in the regenerative medicine space. Additionally, the FDA granted permission for the procedure in this article through IND (Investigational New Drug) use.

Thu, Feb 6 5:39pm · Restored knee function transforms patient's life, inspires giving

James Reibel, M.D., and Barbara Reibel

Mayo Clinic benefactors James
Reibel, M.D., and Barbara Reibel were always on the go — even in retirement.
That is until Dr. Reibel’s chronic knee pain became debilitating and threatened
the couple’s active lifestyle. Their 25-year patient history with Mayo Clinic
led the couple back to Mayo where they learned about regenerative medicine
techniques available through the Regenerative Medicine Therapeutics Suites at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida. 

Read more about Dr. Reibel’s
restored knee function and how Dr. and Mrs. Reibel’s experiences at Mayo Clinic
inspired them to give back in Mayo Clinic Magazine.

Thu, Jan 16 11:44am · Collaboration brings innovative regenerative therapies to babies with rare heart defect

A collaboration bringing together
regional centers and advocacy groups to accelerate innovation and discovery is
expanding, bringing clinical trials and expertise to more patients with
Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS) across the country. Led by Mayo
Clinic’s Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for HLHS
, the collaboration
began in 2017 and now has 10 members. Nine are hospitals and one is an advocacy
group for patients and families.

HLHS is a rare and complex form
of congenital heart disease in which the left side of a child’s heart is
severely underdeveloped. Today, standard treatment for people with HLHS
includes three staged surgeries that enable the right ventricle to pump blood
to the entire body. While
many patients are able to live relatively normal lives as a result, there’s often
a need for treatment later in life. Approximately half of all patients will
still need a heart transplant by age 10. 

“The consortium allows for a
decrease in the amount of time from research and discovery to the clinical
application of innovative cell-based therapies,” says Tim
Nelson, M.D., Ph.D.
, director of the Todd and Karen Wanek Family
Program for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome.

The program works with hospitals
across the U.S. to develop innovative cell-based research opportunities to
transform the lives of people living with HLHS.

Regenerative medicine strategies
have the potential to be an additional treatment for the management of critical
congenital heart disease. Using stem cells of different types and from various
sources — including autologous cells (from the patient’s own body) —
regenerative therapies may stimulate cardiac tissue to grow stronger and heal
faster after surgery. 

Consortium members include Children’s of Alabama, Children’s Hospital Colorado, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Children’s Minnesota, The
Children’s Hospital at OU Medicine
, Children’s
Hospital of Philadelphia
, Cincinnati
Children’s
, Mayo Clinic, and Ochsner
Hospital for Children
, as well as the advocacy group Sisters by Heart.

To date, 71 patients have been
treated on four regenerative therapy clinical trials sponsored by the program.
A Phase IIb study is currently open at six hospitals across the U.S.  During the second of three surgeries to
repair the heart, stem cells from the baby’s own umbilical cord blood are
injected into the heart muscle to help it grow stronger. New studies are in
development to include other single ventricle-dependent heart defects, as well
as to use stem cells during other planned surgeries. 

“By entering into this
collaboration, we are making it possible for all children with HLHS to be able
to participate in groundbreaking cell-based treatments, no matter their
location,” says Dr. Nelson.

To learn more, visit the Mayo
Clinic’s Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for Hypoplastic Left Heart
Syndrome
 website.

###

The HLHS Program is a highly
comprehensive program advancing causes and cures for congenital heart disease,
in particular hypoplastic left heart syndrome. The program takes a multifaceted
research approach that includes imaging and outcomes, human genetics, and
regenerative medicine. The Center
for Regenerative Medicine
is a champion of regenerative approaches to
medical conditions such as those within the HLHS Consortium.

Dec 18, 2019 · Stem Cells and Chronic Kidney Disease

Thank you for your interest. We would be happy to connect with you regarding regenerative medicine research, stem cell treatments and/or research at Mayo Clinic. Please call our Regenerative Medicine Consult Service at 844-276-2003 to schedule an appointment to speak with us. There is no charge for the appointment. We look forward to hearing from you.

Dec 5, 2019 · Mayo Clinic research is a step toward hope for spinal cord injuries

Thanks for your interest. Although enrollment for Phase I of the stem cell study for spinal cord injury is closed, Part II of this research study will begin in the near future. If you would like to learn more on the upcoming Phase II study, please email NEUROINFORMATICS@mayo.edu.

If you are interested in other spinal cord injury research, please consider searching online at clinicaltrials.mayo.edu.

Dec 3, 2019 · Mayo Clinic research is a step toward hope for spinal cord injuries

Thanks for your interest. Although enrollment for Phase I of the stem cell study for spinal cord injury is closed, Part II of this research study will begin in the near future. If you would like to learn more on the upcoming Phase II study, please email NEUROINFORMATICS@mayo.edu.

If you are interested in other spinal cord injury research, please consider searching online at clinicaltrials.mayo.edu.

Dec 2, 2019 · Mayo Clinic research is a step toward hope for spinal cord injuries

Thanks for your interest. Although enrollment for Phase I of the stem cell study for spinal cord injury is closed, Part II of this research study will begin in the near future. If you would like to learn more on the upcoming Phase II study, please email NEUROINFORMATICS@mayo.edu.

If you are interested in other spinal cord injury research, please consider searching online at clinicaltrials.mayo.edu.

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